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College Planning Information

Sting Soccer Club

Advice for the “College-Bound” Student-Athlete

INTRODUCTION

Welcome to Sting’s College Advisory Page. Here you will find some very useful information that will assist high school age athletes in their preparation and transition to College. Sting Soccer Club takes much pride in its long-standing tradition of assisting in the placement of thousands of student-athletes at the collegiate level. A large percentage of our membership aspires to continue playing soccer whilst studying for an undergraduate degree. We strive to educate & assist to make this dream a reality.

Before getting started, it is important to note that whilst there are general guidelines, rules, regulations and proposed timelines in place; the recruitment process is not the same for everybody (athletes or college coaches). Quite simply, there are many things outside of your control that can have a significant impact on the opportunities and scholarship aid that may be presented. Instead, it is important to be educated, organized and proactive in the areas that you can control.

 

IT’S OUT OF YOUR CONTROL!

Some contributing factors outside of your control are:

  1. For Women’s Soccer, collegiate programs across the country are permitted to award he following number of athletic scholarships by division or affiliation:

DIVISION

# of SCHOLARSHIPS

# of PROGRAMS

NCAA D1

14

314

NCAA D2

9.9

223

NAIA

12

409

NJCAA

18

276

 

  1. Taking a NCAA D1 program for example, with approximately 25-30 spots on a roster – a maximum of 14 full athletic scholarships can be divided up amongst those rostered at the coaches discretion. Expanding here, this scholarship may be divided up equally among all players on the roster (28 players = 50% scholarship for all players = 14 scholarships), allocated in full to 14 players (28 players, 100% scholarship for 14 players, 0% scholarship for other 14 players = 14 scholarships) or divided up any which way in-between. Important to consider here that year upon year, the way this scholarship has been allocated significantly impacts the available finance to a college coach.
  2. Staying with the example of 28 players on a roster, a coach may have 3 goalkeepers, 8 defenders, 10 midfield players and 7 forwards that make up the balance of the roster. In a particular graduating class, the coach may graduate 4 forwards, 2 goalkeepers and 2 midfielders. Leaving the coach with scholarship funds to allocate, but priority to fill in these voids on the roster.  Therefore, a defender aspiring to play at this particular university may have limited opportunity, scholarship offered or simply be overlooked as a result of such conditions. It doesn’t make you any less talented it is simply a matter of circumstance that the opportunity / need at that particular program just isn’t there for that year.
  3. Coaching changes are relatively frequent at the collegiate level. An incoming coach may choose to take the program in a completely different direction. This may work in your favor as further opportunities may present themselves or previous opportunities are eliminated.

 

IN CONTROL – BEING ‘PROACTIVE’

So what is in your control? There are several areas within which you can be better educated and active with in order to enhance your ability to establish eligibility and open doors to further opportunity. Of course, on the field it’s about developing the technical, tactical, physical and mental abilities to be equipped for play at the collegiate level. But off the field, ensuring you are academically eligible, communicating & planning appropriately and ‘marketing’ / ‘showcasing’ your talents are key.

 

  • ACADEMIC ELIGIBILITY

 

As soon as a student athlete enters high school it is important to monitor academics closely, even though the idea of going off to college seems like it’s a long way off! It is essential to understand that the work done in the classroom can positively and negatively impact on a student athletes’ opportunity to excel beyond high school at a school of their choice. It is also very important to consider that student-athletes take classes in their freshman year of high school that directly affect their NCAA eligibility. We strongly advise that you schedule an appointment with your high school guidance counselor upon enrollment at High School.

 

In order to be eligible for practice, to compete and to receive athletic scholarship in your first full time year at an NCAA division I or II program you must graduate high school and meet ALL of the following requirements. Meeting these standards will also be sufficient to establish NAIA eligibility also:

                                

NCAA D1 – ACADEMIC STANDARDS 

 NCAA D2 – ACADEMIC STANDARDS

If you Enroll AFTER Aug 1st, 2016

To be eligible to practice, compete and receive athletics scholarships in your first full-time year at a Division I school, you must graduate high school and meet ALL of the following requirements:

 

  1. Complete 16 NCAA core courses:
  • 4 years of English;
  • Three years of math (Algebra I or higher)
  • Two years of natural / physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it)
  • Two years of social science
  • One additional year of English, math or natural / physical science: and
  • Four additional years of English, math, natural / physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy

 

  1. Complete 10 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural / physical science, before the start of your seventh semester. Once you begin your seventh semester, you may not repeat or replace any of those 10 courses for GPA improvement
  2. Earn at least a 2.3 GPA in your core courses
  3. Earn an SAT combined score or ACT sum score that matches your core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale for students enrolling on or after August 1, 2016

If you Enroll BEFORE Aug 1st, 2018

To be eligible to practice, compete and receive athletics scholarships in your first full-time year at a Division II school, you must graduate high school and meet ALL of the following requirements:

 

  1. Complete 16 core courses:
  • Three years of English;
  • Two years of math (Algebra I or higher)
  • Two years of natural / physical science (including one year of lab science if your high school offers it)
  • Two years of social science
  • Three additional year of English, math or natural / physical science: and
  • Four additional years of English, math, natural / physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy

 

  1. Earn at least a 2.0 GPA in your core courses
  2. Earn an SAT combined score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68 

 

  • PROACTIVE WITH PLANNING

 

Many believe that college recruitment is the sole result of one or two factors such as scouting at a showcase event or the team coach. It may be for some, but reality for most is that the more proactive you are in a number of areas, the more efficient you are with your time and effort. The result is being more informed and concentrated with realistic destinations and positioned well for any opportunities there may be at the right time. An aspiring student athlete should start to consider some of the following factors for a potential college as early as 9th grade:

 

  • Division of Play (NCAA I, NCAA II, NAIA, NJCAA) in line with a realistic evaluation of playing ability
  • Location of School
  • Academic Programs Offered
  • Cost of Tuition, Accommodation and Meal Plan
  • Size of School
  • Academic Standards at School or Acceptance
  • Religious Affiliation

 

Having considered some of these, 9th graders should start to compile a list of around 30-50 collegiate programs that meet the desired criteria. Remember, what is appealing to one, is not always appealing to another. This is YOUR process and should not be determined by others. We encourage you compile a list that is made up of institutions at which you would be happy to attend irrespective of soccer. Look at the whole picture – would you still be happy studying and living at a particular school if injured? What if you are not in the starting 11 or on 18-player roster for extended periods of time?

 

  • COMMUNICATION

 

Once you have compiled a list of programs that meet your desired criteria, it is important to then begin communication with the program. Essential, that the coach at each particular program is aware of your interest in attending their institution of employment as a student-athlete. The most frequent method of contact with a college coach is email although others should be utilized in line with / whilst being aware of NCAA rules & regulations (outlined below). Important is that college coach wants to communicate with, and learn about the student-athlete, not the parent(s) of the student-athlete. Players must learn to be proactive with communication and do so in an effective manner.

 

Method of Communication

Sophomore Year

Junior Year

Senior Year

 

Recruiting Materials

You may receive brochures for camps, questionnaires, NCAA materials and nonathletic recruiting publications

You may begin receiving September 1 of your Junior Year

Allowed

 

Telephone Calls

You may make calls to the coach at your expense only. The college coach cannot call you

You may make calls to the coach at your expense. College coach may call after September 1 of Junior year

Allowed by both Student-Athlete and Coach

 

Off-Campus Contact

None Allowed

Allowed Starting July 1 after your Junior Year

Allowed

 

Official Visit

None Allowed

Allowed - Day 1 of Junior Year

Allowed

 

Unofficial Visit

None Allowed

You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits except during a “dead period”

You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits except during a “dead period”

Electronic Correspondence (text message, email, instant messenger)

All forms permissible from student to coach. The college coach cannot contact you

Email & Fax permissible September 1 of Junior Year only from Coach-Student

All forms permissible September 1 of your senior year

 

04/18/18: NCAA D1 ADPOTS NEW RECRUITING LEGISLATION:

http://www.ncaa.org/about/resources/media-center/news/division-i-council-adopts-recruiting-legislation

Communication should be as frequent as once every month with each program of interest. It should be personalized, not a “mass email” with a generic ‘tone.’ Research and mention some recent achievements the program has had, some developments at the school or some connection you have with the program such as a previous visit or family alumni. This personal approach will enhance the effectiveness of the communication, signaling a genuine interest vs. one that is (metaphorically speaking) simply ‘casting a large net, in hope of a catch.’

Remember! Depending on your age / grade, a college coach may not be able to respond to your email or return a phone call directly to you. Be sure to copy your coach in all email correspondence or include your coach contact information in a voicemail to ensure the college coach has a line of communication back to you.

RESOURCES

 

  • TEAM COACH

Your coach is certainly someone who will be able to provide some perspective in terms of playing ability. Your coach can also facilitate in communication between prospective schools and athlete. Be sure to visit with your coach to be clear about communication guidelines and ability level / potential.

 

 

  • NCAA COLLEGE-BOUND ATHLETE HANDBOOK

A valuable resource with much more information on considerations and helpful checklists for the college-bound athlete:

NCAA D1 - http://www.ncaapublications.com/p-4547-2018-2019-ncaa-division-i-manual-august-version-available-august-2018.aspx

NCAA D2 http://www.ncaapublications.com/p-4548-2018-2019-ncaa-division-ii-manual-august-version-available-august-2018.aspx

NCAA D3 -http://www.ncaapublications.com/p-4549-2018-2019-ncaa-division-iii-manual-august-version-available-august-2018.aspx